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Cholula Churches

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Happy birthday, Mexico! Actually, I’m not 100% clear on the history behind Mexico’s September 16 independence day . . . I do know that it involved a priest-rebel yelling the “grito” on the night of September 15 . . .

Whatever the case, I think you should eat tacos (or one of the authentic recipes here) and drink margaritas this weekend!

The holiday reminded me to post some of the pretty pics from our trip to Cholula, though months have passed. Mama Rote, who was also on the trip, focused her photo efforts on the beautiful churches in Cholula (as well as the neighboring city Puebla), of which there are hundreds. Neither of us is big into photography (Can you tell from my cell phone pics on this blog? Sorry.), so I thought she was rather brilliant to narrow her scope in such an artsy photojournalist-ic way, specifically on the church towers against the sky.

All of these were taken with her phone—unedited!:

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It’s such an incredibly beautiful place, as you can see. Thanks, Mama Rote for your (phone!) photo essay.

Our trip to Cholula fell during Holy Week, which was a great time to visit, aside from the strange bank hours. As I mentioned, Cholula (actually two cities: San Pedro Cholula and San Andres Cholula) is known for its churches. When the Spanish took over the existing native city, they built churches on each and every pagan temple or worship site, and of course that was a lot, since there were deities for rain, sun, various animals, etc. Legend holds that there are 365 churches, one for each day of the year.

Over and over I wished we had a personal art history and/or religion professor to give more details on a certain church, how they were used since sometimes they were just a block away from one another, and a thousand other questions about the special displays for Holy Week. But I had to let it go and just take everything in. I did ask a guy in one of the churches what the fresh fruit hanging from the ceiling meant. Good Spanish practice, but not great for finding more information.

me: Hi. Do you speak English?
guy: No.
me: Why is there fruit in the church?
guy: For Holy Week.
me: OK. . . But, I don’t understand. I’m from the United States. In our churches, we don’t have fruit for Holy Week. The fruit means new life?
guy: Yes.
me: OK. Thanks for your help.

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The two required churches to visit in Cholula are Santa Maria Tonantzintla (where these pics of Mary Tobin and Abuela came from), with crazy syncretic decor covering the inside; and San Francisco Acatapec, with gorgeous gorgeous talavera tile covering the outside.

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That one was my favorite. The most beautiful church I’ve ever seen. We took pictures, but they don’t convey how overwhelmingly breathtaking it was. (No pictures allowed inside Santa Maria Tonantzintla, but you can learn more about both churches here.)

Which photo is your favorite? I love the yellow one at the top of the post, and the nighttime shot.

P.S. We considered it, but are not naming our daughter Cholula. (Or Sriracha, or Chauffeur, my brothers’ suggestions.)

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3 thoughts on “Cholula Churches

  1. Pingback: Spoiled Rich Kids | tell me a story

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